Learning From: BKLYNR

BKLYNRThe extreme saturation of the internet is a cause of annoyance for many people. Facebook users, for instance, usually enjoy the social network’s connection value, but are drained by the constant invitations (Facebook Events, Farmville requests, etc.) Today, artists and businesses alike are often focused exclusively on dropping prices as low as possible, and are willing to sacrifice quality to get there.

A recent Brooklyn startup, aptly titled BKLYNR, is doing just the opposite, though. And it’s working.

BKLYNR’s mission is to create quality journalism about Brooklyn, specifically topics that are usually ignored (i.e. they don’t write about food trucks). But this theme of quality is densely engrained in every aspect of the publication – which focuses on politics, culture, urban development and the community at large – from the stunning website design to the confident yet approachable voice in their Tweets. As a subscriber since the day they launched, I would describe what I’ve seen from BKLYNR pretty simply: they’re confident that they’re creating something truly valuable, and are willing to bet that you’ll appreciate the quality enough to pay for it.

BKLYNR 2For artists/bands, aside from BKLYNR’s prioritization of quality, there is a different (and truly massive) lesson to learn here. It is critical to recognize that, again, they are not writing about the popular, common, trendy topics. Instead, they are creating content for an extremely focused audience that most people simply don’t really care about. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard new artists, whose goals are not much different than a startup business, talk about how they play an obscure genre and therefore find it too difficult to get their name out there.

In reality, though, focusing on a niche audience allows you to become a trusted source, while diving directly into your community much more easily than you would if you were trying to appeal to everyone. The beauty of the internet is that it allows like-minded people to form communities around things they love. So, if you’re a new artist worried that your music is too obscure to appeal to the mainstream, recognize that, today, obscurity is actually empowering, and that the difference between failure and success is often just a matter of embracing the pocket of the world that you identify with.

RELATED POSTS:

1) Daytrotter: How Community and Value Can Trump “Cheap”

2) The Power of Focus and the Danger of Expansion

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4 thoughts on “Learning From: BKLYNR

  1. again inspiring. even though i am not living in brooklyn, but this applies everywhere. Its the good old “you cant please everybody”.

    For me as a person, making music that I am not feeling is not an option at this particular moment in time. However, I have seen multiple persons set aside their personal musical preferences for commercial success. And many times, I see them fail miserably..

    • Thanks David, and this definitely applies across all areas like you mentioned. Yep, when someone’s initial goal is to get “big” it rarely ends that way.

      Thanks,
      Ethan

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